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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
for us to understand where this came from. senator mccain and i are responsible for section 313, and i think when people understand what it is all these arguments i've heard against it none of them hold weight. what we're doing is trying to experiment in the green energy at the expense of our ability to defend america and our readiness. our military is deployed in more locations around the world at a greater operate-rate than was ever the case during the cold war. i sometimes say i look wistfully back on the days of the cold war. back then we had an enemy that we could define. he was an enemy was predictable. that's not the case anymore. after almost two decades of fighting all these contingents worldwide dlawg klug four major regional conflicts with a force structure that's 40% smaller and equipment that is decades older than the military readiness during its decline. this is what we're faced with right now and all is coming at a time when the obama administration has cut the defense budget, projecting over the ten-year period by some $487 billion and if the obama sequestration were t
to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yes well, you know, john mccain we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion who he thinks should be over in the mideast talking to these people. >> even someone as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that, but we need someone of enormous prestige and influence to sit down with the parties together and work as a broker. >> when we see mccain saying something nice about a democrat, he has to go and say one more thing. this is john mccain once again. >> if this god-forbid violence escalates, if someone was there brokering the process and bringing a halt to it. now the president makes phone callscalls from burma? i can tell that you al-qaeda is on the rise and they're moving throughout the middle east, and we'll pay a very heavy price for it because of the lack of american leadership. >> you know michael, he mentions kissinger from the 70s, baker from the 90s and burma, that's not even what the country is called any more.
to him coming out against-- >> and threatening this filibust wer john mccain which i think is an irrationalath on their parts. not because presidents have the option and should have the benefit of the doubt on a confirmation to the cabinet. this isn't a judicial lifetime appointment. and i don't senator graham or mccain was publicly vocal when secretary condoleezza rice was nominated for that position, having been national execute adviser, and predicted the arrival of the mushroom cloud because of a nuclear weapons that iraq was then, under saddam hussein, harboring. sthere seems to be a degree of irrationality. the president has now made it a big fight. and we've seen liberal press people come out citing the shortcomings-- personality shortcomings of susan rice. it's sort of a bizarre season, and i can't figure out where this is going. >> brown: david what, do you think? why have republicans made this such-- made her such a focal part, and made this such a fight? >> i guess my theory is that she's a sharp-tongued blunt person and in the past has taken some shots at john mc
and is a distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he is now running the american action forum. he is one of the best hot shots on fiscal issues but does it kindly and then we have steve case. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, jeff immelt had that but not for long. steve case, one of the founders and chairman of aol, he chairs the entrepreneurship council, chairman of revolution, very tied up in trying to think about what are the spark the drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school. engage thousands of people, thousands of voices, discussions with hundreds of economic leaders and come up with a eight point plan of things you are advocating. i have gone through and some of that makes a lot of sense to me. it would have made sense in the 1990s and the 1980s. what makes you think this is such a big deal now? >> i want to say we have had a chance to interact with the jobs council in the harvard business school effort and
of the political parties who control their agendas. john mccain the original sponsor of the bill now denounces his own hanley work. will it's hope in the post election atmosphere this dynamic can change and mccain can proudly support his very own bill. let me close by saying i do think america is exceptional. it is the global melding pot, a place where the universal nation is being created. we may not do better in immigration than anyone before but we do assimilation better than anyone. people from all over the world come to this country and almost magically become real americans but part of being a real american is urging the country to look at its flaws and change them. let's get started. >>> as president obama readies for a second term, i wondered who could best shed light on the challenges he faces and how to deal with them. the president is an avid student of american history so i thought it was fitting to ask two great pulitzer prize-winning historians to sit down with me. robert carroll has written four biographies and jon meacham has a new book out on a twice elected president. the book is
't heard john mccain or lindsey grame say susan rice should not be secretary of state if president obama wants her to be. >> and california congress welcome karen bass also ratzed concerns about the opposition to susan rice. >> this really compromises us and makes us look ridiculous i believe internationally because as far as i'm concerned, again, this is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle that are still recovering from november 6th. the election is over. >> chip, is it fair? what's going on here with this opposition? >> well, unfortunately, i think this has a little bit to do with politics on both sides, and it's always kind of funny to watch both parties after an election when they go after the other one's nominees and go this is all politics, this is terrible, and yet when they're on the opposite side they do the same thing. senator mccain and senator graham certainly have points they'll discus during the nomination process. susan rice is not the nominee to be the next united states secretary of state. and when that process happens, i think the senate will do its job through
for president in the 21st century. both bush, mccain and romney, none of them took the position. said that simply says those in the tea party and far right are in the tea party and the far right and have not infiltrated to mainstream thinking even in the republican party. >> that goes back to what mr. marc fauntroy said in termsf investment and not just focus on it as spending. >> i just want to pick up on janet's point with regard to speaker boehner. he may well be the most important person in all these conversations. the huskies to get that to a team. we talk about these broad bipartisan approaches. the reality is we went through this with the affordable care act. so over the course -- [inaudible] >> its members. it's not. we know going back from that newt gingrich became speaker come in the house is generally run like this. no bill they can't get a majority of the maturity will see the floor of the house. now if speaker boehner decided that i don't have the majority of my own caucus, but i have a critical enough mass to put a pill in place that will settle this to get us to move on
, but obama rice did say herself that with a lot of criticism coming from republicans and specifically john mccain has made some comments about her essentially saying that and that she do a maya culpa and retract what she has said or at least set it right. this controversy isn't going away, but let's listen to what ambassador rice did say. i made clear that it was preliminary, and that our investigation would give us the definitive answers. everyone, particularly the intelligence community, has worked in good faith to provide the best assessment based on the information available. >> it doesn't appear that this will go away. that probably won't end it. as we know, there have been congressional hearings and also we have the fbi investigation and then the state department investigation as well. until those conclude, it may be very difficult to really put an end to this debate. >> jill dougherty, thanks so much. >>> meanwhile, president barack obama delivered his annual thanksgiving address giving thanks for the blessings we all share as americans. >> thanksgiving is a chance to put it all in perspec
office, and he is a very distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he's now running the american action forum, and he's one of the best hawks out there on fiscal issues, but he does it kindly. [laughter] and we have -- and then we have steve case who i just heard how's, you know, steve, i wanted to give him the chairmanship of the jobs council, but he said jeff immelt has that, but not for long. [laughter] so jeff immelt of ge. steve case, one of the founders and chairmen of aol. he is the chairman of revolution, he's very tied up in trying to think about what are the sparks that drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. so, michael, you've now been involved with a major study, a u.s. competitiveness project at the harvard business school, engaged thousands of people, thousands of voices, surveys, discussions with hundreds of economic leaders, and you've come up with an eight-point plan of things you're advocating. i've gone through it and, you know, some of it makes a lot of sense to me. and i guess it would have ma
, and john mccain. what is going on here? it certainly looks to a layman that there is a desperate scramble to find a way to raise revenue in a cbo-scoreable way that would not be seen as violating the pledge. the question is, is the pledge losing its magic? >> i really take very strong exception to taking this poll seriously. because if you ask people, the vast majority of whom are not going to be subjected to this tax, and they are being told that somebody else will have to pay it -- and if you discover in the process that only 60% of the voters are in favor of that, i think it speaks for itself and speaks very well of the american people. if you have a public opinion poll where the voters would be asked how would you feel if we cut all of your taxes by half, and also give your children free tuition, except we would have to have a referendum on exiling barack obama from the united states, i would be interesting to hear the results of this vote. polls like that in my view should not be part of the serious conversation. everything else you said i completely agree with. [laughter] >> by cont
economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he's now running the american action forum, and he's the -- he's one of the best hawks out there on fiscal issues, but he does it kindly. [laughter] we have -- then we have steve case who i just heard, steve,mented to give him the chairmanmanship of the jobs council, but jeff has it, but not for long. steve case, a founder and chairman of aol. he chairs the entrepreneurship counsel for the president. he is the chairman of revolution. very tied up in trying to think about what are the sparks that drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here? so, michael, you've now been involved with a major study, u.s. competitiveness project at the harvard business school, engaged thousands of people, thousands of voices, surveys, discussions with hundreds of economic leaders, and you've come up with an eight-point plan on what you advocate. i we want through it. it makes sense to me. it would have made since to me in the 1990s and 1980s. what makes you think it's a big deal now? >> thank you. we had a chance to inte
budget office and he is a very distinguished economists. economichn mccain's advisor and he is now running the american action forum. of his one of the best out there on fiscal issues but he does it kindly. and then we have steve. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, but he said jeff immelt has that, but not for long. it is one of the founders and chairman of aol. he chairs the entrepreneurship counsel for the president. the interesting thing about the sparks for creativity. michael, you have been involved in a major study with the harvard business school. you're engaged thousands of people, thousands of voices coming discussions with hundreds of economic leaders and you have come up with an eight-point plan. i have gone through its and some of it makes a lot of sense to me. it would have made sense in the 1980's camera so it makes you think this is such a big deal now? >> we have had a chance to interact with the jobs council and we have a tremendous alignment. the striking things that we found is that we all agree on almost everything that really needs to be don
mccain, lindsey graham, and others on their meeting with you in ambassadors on the libyan attack that killed four americans. also dick durbin on fiscal cliff negotiations. political will host a discussion of the fiscal cliff with grow from norquist on c- span to add it o'clock a.m. eastern. i not o'clock a.m. eastern, tom foley and others look at lessons from the 1990 budget deal. the president of amtrak and a representative of the united transportation unit will speak about the operations aboutamtrak. >> washington went to harvard law school. at the urging of one of his brothers, he went to illinois. he of thrived after about eight months' journey by ship, state ge coach into a mining town. he boarded himself in a log cabin. he established a law practice. he worked his way up. he became a successful lawyer and got involved politically. he ran for congress and served eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln from illinois and ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washbourne was a close confidant during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbour
xrooe hensive immigration reforce. >> i think ted cruz. lindsey graham and john mccain. i think people like paul ryan nf the house. people who come out of a sort of reagan-esque, kemp-esque pro growth camp within the republican party. i think there's a big opportunity for them to weigh in on the debate. >> when people talk comprehensive reform the big issue, a big issue, probably the biggest, is there a path to citizenship for people who were here. governor romney was firm on that point. did he leave the party on immigration in a bad place? >> i think the party has been suffering on the issue of immigration for years. i think the problem transcends mitt romney. i don't think his position helped the -- helped the republican problem but it predates him. the failure of mccain/kennedy was something republicans got blamed for. in the 1990s there were some really nasty debates and very few, you know, very few republican voices willing to stand up on the side of immigration reform. we've been suffering -- look, there is a nativist, isolationist protectionist strand within the republican party
the mccain scholarship program for challenged kids to get scholarships to go to private schools. when that thing was past 10 years ago, you had one member of the black caucus vote for it. when it came up for renewal last year, you have the majority of the black caucus and the hispanic caucus vote for it. and each of them said, we are doing this because it is helping our children. as we go forward, that has to be the order of the day for country. thank you all very much. and i appreciate your generosity. as i said, i love to next. i want to take some questions before we -- i love gen next. i want to take some questions before we wrap up. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, kevin, very much. i appreciate what you are doing for our country. my question is, in california, we have not adopted a charter schools and vouchers and choice as much as you have experienced in washington d.c. might experience is that once we introduced choice, the bar will rise four parts -- for public schools because then they have to keep up with the charter schools and the voucher schools that parents like to go
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)